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Randolph pilot killed in Afghanistan

Maj. Jeff Ausborn might as well move his office outside next to the flightline. It might make his job of coordinating and tracking air support a bit easier.

Maj. Jeff Ausborn, a 99th Flying Training Squadron instructor pilot, was killed April 27 when a shooter opened fire at Kabul International Airport killing eight U.S. servicemembers and one American contractor. (Courtesy photo)

Randolph Air Force Base, Texas -- An Airman assigned to the 12th Flying Training Wing was killed in Kabul, Afghanistan, April 27 when a shooter opened fire at Kabul International Airport killing eight U.S. servicemembers and one American contractor.

Maj. Jeff Ausborn, a 99th Flying Training Squadron instructor pilot, was deployed to the 438th Air Expeditionary Wing where he served as a C-27 instructor pilot. The 19-year Air Force veteran and native of Gadsden, Ala. died of wounds sustained in the shooting. He was 41.

"The loss of Jeff is devastating not only to the squadron but the wing as well. He has served our wing and his nation honorably," said Col. Richard Murphy, 12th FTW commander. "Our hearts and prayers go out to Jeff's family and to the families of those affected by this terrible act."

According to his wife, Suzanna Ausborn, he volunteered last year to go to Afghanistan to teach new Afghan pilots how to fly the C-27 aircraft. He was in a meeting when the attack occurred.

"He was the most compassionate, kind, patient and understanding husband, father, pilot and supervisor," she said. "He was a great communicator, we talked nearly every day - that's how I knew something was wrong, I didn't hear from him. I miss him so much."

Major Ausborn is survived by his wife, Suzanna, and five children, Emily, 15, Eric, 12, Shelby, 10, Mitchell Maloy, 21 and Summer Maloy, 17.

A date and time for a memorial service for Major Ausborn to be held at Randolph have yet to be determined.

Editor's Note: Photos were taken during Major Ausborn's deployment with the Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa, Camp Lemonier, Dijibouti in 2008. Courtesy of Airman's Magazine.